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Recent watching - Moving at the Speed of Procrastination. [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
E.G.

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Recent watching [Apr. 22nd, 2018|09:22 am]
E.G.
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Christine purchased "Molly's Game" an Alan Sorkin written and directed film. I suspect it diverged a bit from the actuality of the case, but it was well done nonetheless. The cast is excellent, and it's got the same sort of explanatory element as "The Big Short" where the narrator explains the complexity of skiing or high finance to the viewer. I am curious if there's a term for this; it leads me to reflect on how Neal Stephenson's writing has been identified as having a strong didactic thread. It was enjoyably diverting and Idras Elba gives a wonderfully indignant speech.

Last night we went to see the Giacometti film, "The Final Portrait." I think Christine was wanting a more existential and cerebral film; instead it is a look by an outsider of sorts, American James Lord, at Giacometti's life over the two weeks plus Lord sat for Giacometti to paint his portrait. There's a bit of the American raised eyebrow at the the sexual relationships of Giacometti & his wife (Giacometti's prostitute-model a far larger presence than the brief glimpse of Annette's lover. The film is desaturated at a level i think only met by "The Road" in my watching experience (which is limited), with only a few brief bursts of color -- Chagal's Operahouse ceiling, the pool water, Annete's dress, and Caroline's car.

Christine's comment was, "It was too funny, i didn't like that." or something along those lines, at which her sister & i laughed. Giacometti was portrayed as tortured and frustrated and struggling with his relationship to his work, and those around him had to find a way to cope. Giacometti's moods were like a force of nature, sweeping up his household and the narrator into a furious current, then leaving them abandoned on some beach, before sweeping them up again. The humor was part of how they coped -- but there was pain as well

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