?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Friday: Up very early to watch a presentation out of the Netherlands.… - Moving at the Speed of Procrastination. [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
E.G.

[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

[Sep. 3rd, 2017|07:42 am]
E.G.
[Tags|, ]

Friday: Up very early to watch a presentation out of the Netherlands. What i have learned so far could have been skimmed off a diagram, i think with grumbles, but there are probably subtle details that i am actually picking up. ... Ah, participation in the QA for remote folks is adequate.

I've awakened EVERYONE, apparently, although i think Christine was actually awakened by Luigi. He started his morning yowling in the entry hallway that has such a lovely acoustic quality that amplifies his complaining. I've read that cats "meow" to communicate with their owners, that it's a communication developed between the two. Years ago, when Luigi was our neighbor, he learned that he could get Christine to let him in to his apartment when his owner was away by yowling piteously at his door (which shared a landing with our door). He now does this in the mornings, hoping that some miracle will occur and he will be able go outside. I guess my going to my work desk made him think it was 8 am and time to start asking to be let outside.

--== ∞ ==--

I spent some nice chunks of Saturday afternoon in the yard. I have a new tool, a two pronged hoe, which is nicely effective. I found the pitchfork great for deep turning of the soil to get the garden started, but now i'm in the cultivation mode. (Also, i've ruined the pitchfork getting rocks out.)

The Seminole pumpkin, escaping the bounds of the garden, is finally setting fruit. I think it's possible there's a fraction more sun to the west of the plot? I'm thinking i'll just let it go until frost. The yellow squash succumbed to powdery mildew plus too much baking soda treatment. The long stems, jointed with leaf nodes that only had stubs of stems, looked like an algae covered sea monster carcass. I'd started some seeds in hopes that maybe i'd get some more squash before the frosts due in October. I set those out in a new bed: maybe they'll settle in and set fruit. (Little flower buds were on a few of the plants.)

The autumn garden starts i'd made in August are not encouraging. The seed tapes germinated, but nothing seems to be thriving. A dill seedling seems to have taken, and some tiny red cabbage seedlings persist. The radishes came up but the fleshy part of the root seems to be above the dirt and long and stringy.

I've been pondering my assessment.

It seems legumes are a deer food and thus not really going to produce unless we do some serious deer repellent or exclusion work.

The popcorn is a win: while some stalks got nibbled on early, once it gets going it's too tough for deer and the corn itself isn't sweet enough to attract anyone's interest. Sweet corn wouldn't be worth the work.

Squash was great before the powdery mildew, and the dehydration seems a reasonable way to deal with bounty. It seems also to agree with getting a seedling start. The cucumber seedlings from a friend finally seemed to do OK once out of the shadow of the yellow squash. The melons haven't set fruit (shade issue as with the Seminole pumpkin?) but are worth giving a go again.

The collards were great until they became insect magnets. I really miss my daily greens. I probably need to be more aggressive with control. The collards are still sort of producing, so with control i could have had collards all year! Right now i'm wrestling with getting rid of the plants vs hoping that the bugs will go away and i'll have mature collards producing in the autumn. "Hoping bugs will go away." Ha, i guess it's obvious written out like that.

I'll try fame flower again, with seed tape and greenhouse starts....

At this point i went into much more detailed planning elsewhere.

--== ∞ ==--

Large orbweaver spider has made a web in our door frame. Is it planning on catching me? Geeze, spider season has begun. Carolina writing spiders are at work (aka Black-and-Yellow Argiope, Argiope aurantia). Two large wolf spiders watched me work in the garden yesterday. And yes, watched.

LinkReply