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Apparently, my brother has asked my mom to go see a mental health… - Moving at the Speed of Procrastination. [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
E.G.

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[Sep. 8th, 2014|06:00 am]
E.G.
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Apparently, my brother has asked my mom to go see a mental health professional and she might go to prove to us all she doesn't need help.

So there's that.

--==∞==--

In another digital community i'm in, there's discussion about the formation of Death Cafes:

Our objective is 'to increase awareness of death with a view to helping people make the most of their (finite) lives'.

A Death Cafe is a group directed discussion of death with no agenda, objectives or themes. It is a discussion group rather than a grief support or counselling session.


I'm not sure i feel a taboo around talking about death. I certainly feel a taboo around talking about suicide in the sense that i suspect a listener will be more on alert for "cries for help" than actually listening. It's the choice of continued existence or not, though, that has driven my awareness of death.

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Comments:
[User Picture]From: weofodthignen
2014-09-08 04:30 pm (UTC)
If you've looked at the Wikipedia entry you'll see a plethora of newspapers have picked up on this, all with similar observations - some interesting statements by people involved in setting them up or have been to one. It seems to hit each place as "Wow, that's actually a good idea."

M
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[User Picture]From: elainegrey
2014-09-09 01:37 pm (UTC)
The online group discussing it has been quite enthusiastic as well: several of them have been very involved.

Would you have interest in one? Do you feel your practices address your needs around awareness of death?
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[User Picture]From: weofodthignen
2014-09-10 03:00 am (UTC)
No, I think people would be too weirded out by my thoughts, but I enjoyed researching it and I think it's much needed - one of the results of modernity has been that we're supposed to be insulated from death - sadly among the effects of that is that violent death looms even larger in people's experience, as well as it being difficult to assert one's needs and wishes in cases where doctors are involved.

M
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[User Picture]From: daisydumont
2014-09-08 04:34 pm (UTC)
I definitely think our culture needs help with its deep denial about the inevitability of death. Not sure chatting about it in a cafe would help much, but then, maybe it would. Interesting concept, anyway.
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[User Picture]From: elainegrey
2014-09-09 01:39 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure about the chatting, either. Do you feel you and yours have come to terms through your long, shared witness around Gerry's death?
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[User Picture]From: daisydumont
2014-09-09 02:18 pm (UTC)
I think I have. In fact, some people would consider me a bit morbid, in that I think often about issues to do with death and how we all pass into history. Maybe too much! Death doesn't scare me. (Pain does.) My sons are dealing in their own way, without talking to me about it, but I take care to mention Gerry to them as naturally as I can, and their grandparents. Absent a large extended family here, it's the best I can do to keep that sense of what could be called the cloud of witnesses.

(It's a phrase, btw, that makes me jumpy. They'd better not be watching me! It makes me feel paranoid.)
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